Spring Turn Up, Shut Down

Rem+Schroyer%2C+one+of+the+organizers%2C+clarified+questions+about+the+Spring+Turn+Up+dance.++%E2%80%9CJust+like+any+other+school+dance%2C+we+had+professional+security+giving+pat+downs%2C+and+no+alcohol+or+anything+like+that+was+allowed+in+the+event%2C%22+he+said.+%22There+probably+were+people+that+were+intoxicated%2C+but+it%E2%80%99s+the+same+as+any+other+school+event+where+people+get+intoxicated+beforehand.+We+did+the+best+we+possibly+could.%E2%80%9D%0A
Back to Article
Back to Article

Spring Turn Up, Shut Down

Rem Schroyer, one of the organizers, clarified questions about the Spring Turn Up dance.  “Just like any other school dance, we had professional security giving pat downs, and no alcohol or anything like that was allowed in the event,

Rem Schroyer, one of the organizers, clarified questions about the Spring Turn Up dance. “Just like any other school dance, we had professional security giving pat downs, and no alcohol or anything like that was allowed in the event," he said. "There probably were people that were intoxicated, but it’s the same as any other school event where people get intoxicated beforehand. We did the best we possibly could.”

Montgomery Meeds

Rem Schroyer, one of the organizers, clarified questions about the Spring Turn Up dance. “Just like any other school dance, we had professional security giving pat downs, and no alcohol or anything like that was allowed in the event," he said. "There probably were people that were intoxicated, but it’s the same as any other school event where people get intoxicated beforehand. We did the best we possibly could.”

Montgomery Meeds

Montgomery Meeds

Rem Schroyer, one of the organizers, clarified questions about the Spring Turn Up dance. “Just like any other school dance, we had professional security giving pat downs, and no alcohol or anything like that was allowed in the event," he said. "There probably were people that were intoxicated, but it’s the same as any other school event where people get intoxicated beforehand. We did the best we possibly could.”

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Spring Turn Up dance on February 23rd was shut down at around 10 p.m. after two teenagers were hospitalized due to intoxication and an alleged gun threat. However, a gun was not located according to Bellingham Police Lieutenant Claudia Murphy and the Bellingham Herald. Organizers Remington Schroyer (12), Jonathan Gunn (12), and Olen Sandeno (12) received a citation, or a call to court, for municipal code violations at the Fraternal Order of Eagles building, according to police reports.

On February 26th, The Bellingham Herald reported on the incident. “They made it sound like we were enabling underage drinking, when that’s not true,” Schroyer said. “Just like any other school dance, we had professional security giving pat downs, and no alcohol or anything like that was allowed in the event. There probably were people that were intoxicated, but it’s the same as any other school event where people get intoxicated beforehand. We did the best we possibly could.”

In reference to the hospitalized girl’s, “They didn’t get let in, and they wouldn’t have been let in,” Schroyer said referring to the fact that security would have stopped anyone with alcohol into the event.
Schroyer said that he and the other organizers would have to attend a court date about the municipal code violation. Bellingham Municipal Code requires people to have a license to host underage dances, which Schroyer and company were unaware of.

Scott Schroyer, the father of Remington Schroyer, said that he believed his son followed due diligence and that they did everything they could to try to keep the event safe. In reference to the organizers’ lack of knowledge about the license, Scott Schroyer said that he thought that this incident and the court hearing would be a good learning opportunity for his son.

“People don’t understand. During the event there were no drugs or alcohol served or brought in the dance. That is illegal. Many people who were intoxicated got to the door were not allowed into our event. The people who were rushed to the hospital- that was totally out of our control. All that matters is that they didn’t get into our event. Yes, the dance and the environment can cause immature teens to make stupid decisions but that is out of our control.” Nathan Berg (10), Squalicum student and event organizer, said.

According to DJ Marcus Polous, a Sehome alumni of 2018, he and the Animal Jam dances, which he began in 2017, are in no way associated with Spring Turn Up or the situation that occurred there. “[It was] not something I’d want my name representing,” he said.

Polous expressed concerns about the future viability of Animal Jam, worried that backers or sponsors may be sued. This is due primarily to the underage dance scene as a whole gaining a bad reputation due to incidents like this.

“The name has become tainted,” he said. “Even though this wasn’t our event, from now on, pretty much all the moms will tip off the cops if they hear the words ‘animal’ and ‘jam’ in the same sentence. Hospitalizations and police at every teen dance shouldn’t be normal, and they haven’t been up until recently. I feel like they’re just clout chasing and skimping on security. They’re not even charitable anymore either.”

Animal Jam was originally created as a fun charitable event for teens which donated profits to charity. The original Animal Jam, for instance, raised over $500 to donate to the Whatcom Humane Society, according to the Whatcom Talk.

Future teen hosted dances will have to be more careful in the future to make sure that no one around the event is intoxicated, and that all rules and regulations are followed. Schroyer’s court date will be coming up soon, and any updates will be reported.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email