Madness in the locker room?

The mystery and answer to why there are no urinals in the boys locker room

Jacob Alexander and Dawson Grahn

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After winter break, students and staff in the physical education department moved over to the new school and had many compliments with few complaints. Most of the issues found could be understood with an obvious reason with why they were the way they were. However, the removal of the urinals in the boys locker room simply didn’t add up in most students minds.

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  • The boys locker room only has three stalls. Students in the locker room question the decision but are not sure what the exact reason is. "The awesome admins should add some urinals," Colin McCarthy (10) said.

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In the old Sehome, student athletes and students taking physical education classes had two urinals in the boys locker room, and two in the bathroom right outside. In the new school, there is a bathroom with urinals on the main hallway, but in the boys locker room, only stalls can be found.

“It’s very crowded when I have to use the restroom,” Colin McCarthy (10), a varsity athlete, said. “Since I played basketball, it took me way longer [to get ready] because I had to wait in line to use the stall.” The lack of urinals seems like a silly thing to complain about but it takes students longer to get ready for their sport or PE classes if they have to use the bathroom.

However, there is a valid reason for the decision. The reasoning and answer can be found right at the top of the chain of command at Sehome: Michelle Kuss-Cybula. Kuss-Cybula is, as most of you know, the principal of Sehome High School, but she also co-led the design process for the new school.

One of our core ideas was ‘Innovation and flexible use of space’”

— Michelle Kuss-Cybula

“One of our core ideas was ‘Innovation and flexible use of space’,” Kuss-Cybula said. The idea behind not having urinals in the boys locker room specifically was not to be an inconvenience but to create a more flexible space.

“As part of visioning,” Kuss-Cybula said, “it was important to have the ability to host tournaments and utilize all four locker rooms male/female.” By having stalls and no urinals in both the male and female locker rooms, it would be much easier to accommodate the needs of other schools that came up for events or matches.

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